Background Information (I) - Gender and Health Background Information (I) What is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition which results from the hearts inability to maintain sufficient cardiac output to meet the metabolic demands of the body. It can be acute or chronic in nature, affect either side of the heart and can be systolic or diastolic.

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Heart failure module 1: background, epidemiology and pathophysiology. Released1 November 2017 Expires: 01 November 2019 Programme: Heart failure 1.5 

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Heart failure is a condition that affects roughly 5.7 million Americans annually and results in about 300,000 deaths each year according to the National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2010).

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Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common form of heart disease. people of African or South Asian background have a higher risk of heart disease. Coronary artery disease | Heart and Stroke Foundation Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common form of heart disease. people of African or South Asian background have a higher risk of heart disease.

8 Nov 2019 Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart 

Heart Failure | National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Heart failure develops over time as the heart's pumping action grows weaker. The condition can affect the right side of the heart only, or it can affect both sides of the heart. Most cases involve both sides of the heart. Right-side heart failure occurs if the heart can't pump enough blood to the lungs to pick up oxygen. JACC: Heart Failure - Journal - Elsevier JACC: Heart Failure publishes the most important findings on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and care of heart failure patients. The goal of the Journal is to improve our understanding of the disease, clinical trial, clinical outcomes, and advances in therapies through timely, insightful scientific communication. Running Head: NURSES’ KNOWLEDGE OF HEART FAILURE Background and Significance Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is unable to adequately pump blood throughout the body or unable to prevent blood from "backing up" into the lungs (CDC, 2006, ¶1).

Congestive Heart Failure | American Journal of Respiratory Congestive heart failure (CHF) complicates the course of a significant proportion of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). In the ICU, CHF may present as a manifestation of newly diagnosed cardiac disease or as an exacerbation of underlying heart disease, as a result of fluid overload or stress accompanying acute illness, surgery, or trauma. Heart Failure | National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Heart failure develops over time as the heart's pumping action grows weaker. The condition can affect the right side of the heart only, or it can affect both sides of the heart. Most cases involve both sides of the heart. Right-side heart failure occurs if the heart can't pump enough blood to the lungs to pick up oxygen. JACC: Heart Failure - Journal - Elsevier JACC: Heart Failure publishes the most important findings on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and care of heart failure patients. The goal of the Journal is to improve our understanding of the disease, clinical trial, clinical outcomes, and advances in therapies through timely, insightful scientific communication. Running Head: NURSES’ KNOWLEDGE OF HEART FAILURE

Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction - RACGP

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