Many men killed in the trenches were buried almost where they fell. If a trench subsided, or new trenches or dugouts were needed, large numbers of  Trench Rats - Warren County Public Schools Pages 1 - 5

World War 1 - Experiences on the Western Front - Home

How were trenches built in World War One? Were they just one big long trench or split up into smaller trenches? If it is the latter, then what was keeping armies  The Deadly Struggles of Living in The Trenches

11 Nov 2011 Lice caused Trench Fever, a nasty and painful disease that began There were long bouts of boredom and rat hunting became a sport. Rats and lice in the trenches - Science Museum As there were so many dead bodies and scraps of food lying about, and the battle was static, the rats grew very fat and bold. In his book Goodbye to All That,  Trench rats killed by a terrier, 1916 - Rare Historical Photos 1 Apr 2014 The rats were attracted by the human waste of war – not simply sewage the bodies of men long forgotten who had been buried in the trenches.

Jul 29, 2014 · the condition in the trenches were really poor with water up to your hip.the trenches even had rats as big as a cat which will eat your foot. Asked in World War 1 , Britain in WW2 , WW1 Trench Warfare Rats - WWI Trenches Rats were not rare in the trenches. In fact, millions of them invaded the trenches. Two types of rats dominated the trenches: brown and black rats (Duffy, 2009, para, 4). A pair of rats could produce around 900 offspring annually (Duffy, 2009). With ample amounts of food, these beasts flourished.

Disease in the trenches | The Biomedical Scientist Magazine

Many men killed in the trenches were buried almost where they fell. If a trench subsided, or new trenches or dugouts were needed, large numbers of 

Trench warfare - Wikipedia

11 Nov 2011 Lice caused Trench Fever, a nasty and painful disease that began There were long bouts of boredom and rat hunting became a sport. Rats and lice in the trenches - Science Museum As there were so many dead bodies and scraps of food lying about, and the battle was static, the rats grew very fat and bold. In his book Goodbye to All That,  Trench rats killed by a terrier, 1916 - Rare Historical Photos

Trench Rats - Student's Friend scraps that littered the trenches, attracted rats. One pair of rats can produce 880 offspring in a year and so the trenches were soon swarming with them. Some of these rats grew extremely large. One soldier wrote: "The rats were huge. They were so big they would eat a wounded man if he couldn't defend himself." Trench Warfare Flashcards | Quizlet What were sap trenches used for and where did they extend to They were used for listening for enemys communication and they extended out to the front lines into no-mans land How big were the trenches The living conditions of the trenches - Trench Warfare In The The big problems in the trenches were lice, rats, and infections. Rats were a constant problem in the trenches there were two common types; brown and black. The most common thing that the rats would do was gorge themselves full of human livers, eyes, fingers and ears and also they would grow to the size of cats in which terrified the soldiers.

Trench life. The night sky over no-man's land. Rats and lice as bedfellows. Here, soldiers write about life in the trenches. In order to see this content you need to  First trenches are dug on the Western Front - HISTORY 16 Nov 2009 There were three different types of trenches: firing trenches, lined on the side facing the the enormous rats—the reality was that the trench system protected the soldiers to a large extent from the worst effects of modern  In The Trenches | Common Reader 7 Jul 2017 [1] As the war extended, secondary trenches were dug, as well as The rats were a perpetual nuisance, feeding off the corpses of dead soldiers and So big they would eat a wounded man if he couldn't defend himself.”[6] In  Mud, Floods and Lice: The World War One Trench Experience

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First World War.com - Encyclopedia - Trench Rats

Mud, Floods and Lice: The World War One Trench Experience

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Sanitary conditions in the trenches were very poor. The filth and foul odor of decaying corpses and human waste from overflowed latrines not only contributed to the spread of disease, it also attracted rats and other vermin like lice that spread infection. Millions of rats infested trenches, some as big as cats.